hiring-best-practices

When you first start your Life Coaching business, it can be tempting to think that you can do it all by yourself, or that you can’t afford to get help.

But chances are, within the first year of trying to do things that way, you’ll realize that despite your best intentions, running a business alone simply isn’t sustainable. There aren’t enough hours in a day to do it all yourself, so you’re given a choice between completely burning out, letting some parts of your business slip, or hiring an extra pair of hands.

I think you already know the truth: there’s no such thing as a ‘self-made millionaire.’ You’ll never create a thriving business on your own. But at the same time, you need to hire the RIGHT teammates, or you’ll actually end up going backwards in terms of time and productivity.

So how do you find the right people? Here’s how to take the first few steps.

1. Determine what you need to delegate.

Which jobs can be done by someone with less training than you have? Which tasks are you doing that are getting no results, because they require more specialized training than you currently possess?

And which ones are taking up the most of your time – time that you should be spending on what you’re good at and passionate about?

Find the most time-consuming task that you can assign to someone better suited to it.

2. Get crystal-clear on who you want to handle that task.

What kind of personality would you like to work with? What disposition would make a person best suited to handling the task you want to delegate?

What skills would they need to have in order to do a good job?

How many hours would they need to work each week?

What payment system do you want to use? Hourly? A percentage of each sale? A set cost per project? A percentage of your profits?

Once you’ve determined these aspects, you’ll be better able to know where to look for your new team member, and what to look for.

3. Figure out where to look

Where do you think your new teammate would be looking for an employer like you?

If you want to outsource less-skilled work to a freelancer, advertising sites or sites dedicated to freelancers would be a good place to start.

If you’re looking for someone more well-established and highly trained, they’re more likely to have a website and company of their own. You can try typing the job description into a search engine, or looking for lists of the top ten companies that work in that field.

You could also look at your list of contacts, and see if you already know someone who works in the area you’re looking to hire, or if any of your contacts know someone.

4. Learn the finer points of hiring a team.

If you took the steps I suggested above, you now know what you need to outsource, how to determine who to hire, and where to look for that person.

But I want to make sure that you’re fully equipped to build your team in a way that helps your business instead of holding it back. So I’d like you to take a moment to ask yourself:

  • “Am I sure I know which teammates I should hire first?”
  • “How much should I pay my team? What’s a fair price for each type of work?”
  • “How do I screen potential teammates, to make sure that I’m hiring the right ones?”
  • “Should I hire them as employees, or as independent contractors? What kind of contracts should I have them sign?”
  • “Will I make enough money that I’m sure I can pay them?”

If you’re unsure of the answers to any of these questions, I can help you. I’ve created multiple 7-figure businesses, and I’ve got an extensive team of great, productive people, so I know how to find and hire the right people to make a Life Coaching business grow.

If you want to learn more about building your coaching business, hiring a team, and attracting enough clients that you can more than afford to pay that team, please scroll up and fill out the form on the right. One of my amazing teammates will get in touch with you, and together you’ll determine whether I’m the right person to help you.

 

 

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